Replica of Albert Kesselring s Ribbon Bar (German Ribbon Bars) for Sale (by ww2onlineshop.com)
Replica of Albert Kesselring s Ribbon Bar (German Ribbon Bars) for Sale (by ww2onlineshop.com)

Replica of Albert Kesselring s Ribbon Bar

Product Code: RI030
Availability: In Stock
Price: CAD$79 CAD$71
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Albert Kesselring's Ribbon Bar

We are proud to offer custom made, high quality German made reproduction ribbon bars. We can currently offer ribbon bars with 2-9 ribbons. We can provide ribbon bar for Imperial Germany, Reichswehr, and Third Reich. Bundeswehr ribbon bars are also available on special request. Prices start at $10.00.

Please contact us to custom made a German Ribbon Bar for you!
Just send us the photo of the ribbon bar to us!
email: support@ww2onlineshop.com 

 
Albert Kesselring
Head-and-shoulders portrait of a uniformed Nazi German air force general in his 50s wearing an Iron Cross
Kesselring wearing his Knight's Cross in 1940
Nickname(s) Smiling Albert
Uncle Albert
Born 30 November 1885
MarktsteftKingdom of Bavaria,German Empire
Died 16 July 1960 (aged 74)
Bad NauheimHessenWest Germany
Allegiance  German Empire (to 1918)
 Weimar Republic (to 1933)
 Nazi Germany (to 1945)
Service/branch Deutsches Heer (1904–22)
Reichswehr (1922–33)
Luftwaffe (1933–45)
Years of service 1904–45
Rank Generalfeldmarschall
Commands held Luftflotte 1
Luftflotte 2
OB South
Army Group C
OB West
Battles/wars

World War I


World War II

Awards Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds
Albert Kesselring (30 November 1885 – 16 July 1960) was a German Luftwaffe Generalfeldmarschall during World War II. In a military career that spanned both World Wars, Kesselring became one of Nazi Germany's most skilful commanders, being one of 27 soldiers awarded the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds. Nicknamed "Smiling Albert" by the Allies[Notes 1] and "Uncle Albert" by his troops, he was one of the most popular generals of World War II with the rank and file.[1]

Kesselring joined the Bavarian Army as an officer cadet in 1904, and served in the artillery branch. He completed training as a balloon observer in 1912. During World War I, he served on both the Western and Eastern fronts and was posted to the General Staff, despite not having attended the War Academy. Kesselring remained in the Army after the war but was discharged in 1933 to become head of the Department of Administration at the Reich Commissariat for Aviation, where he was involved in the re-establishment of the aviation industry and the laying of the foundations for the Luftwaffe, serving as its chief of staff from 1936 to 1938.

During World War II he commanded air forces in the invasions of Poland and France, the Battle of Britain and Operation Barbarossa. As Commander-in-Chief South, he was overall German commander in the Mediterranean theatre, which included the operations in North Africa. Kesselring conducted an uncompromising defensive campaign against the Allied forces in Italy until he was injured in an accident in October 1944. In the final campaign of the war, he commanded German forces on the Western Front. He won the respect of his Allied opponents for his military accomplishments, but his record was marred by massacres committed by troops under his command in Italy.

After the war, Kesselring was tried for war crimes and sentenced to death. The sentence was subsequently commuted to life imprisonment. A political and media campaign resulted in his release in 1952, ostensibly on health grounds. He was one of only three Generalfeldmarschalls to publish his memoirs, entitled Soldat bis zum letzten Tag (A Soldier to the Last Day).

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